International Research Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences






Search for Articles on Google by:
Hassan H Kaabi



Search for Related Articles:
On Google
On Google Scholar





Inconsistency in using early differentiation markers of human pluripotent stem cells


Hassan H Kaabi


Article Number: irjmbs.21.003  |   Pages: 11-18  |   Vol. 6 (2), May 2021   |   DOI: https://doi.org/10.15739/irjmbs.21.003

 Received: February 15, 2021  Accepted: April 15, 2021  Published: May 8, 2021

Abstract

Advances in the field of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have prompted researchers to advocate for the increased development of dependable therapies to cure degenerative diseases and replace damaged tissues. hPSCs have a one-of-a-kind ability to differentiate into all cell types in the body. The ability to characterise homogeneous primary cell populations, such as pluripotent stem cells and germ layer cells, is required for the efficient generation of adult cells. Several in vitro differentiation protocols for germ layer lineages have been extensively researched. There is, however, no standard set of markers that can be used to separate endoderm, ectoderm, and mesoderm populations from hPSC differentiation cultures. This review discusses the inconsistency among studies in identifying endodermal, mesodermal, and ectodermal cells using markers. The search was restricted to markers used in the last 5 years to identify differentiated cells of the three germ layers from hPSCs. The focus of this review, however, is on the most commonly used early differentiation markers.

Keywords:

Differentiation markers, ectoderm markers, mesoderm markers, endoderm markers, Early differentiation.

How to Cite this Article

Kaabi HH(2021). Inconsistency in using early differentiation markers of human pluripotent stem cells. Int. Res. J. Med. Biomed. Sci. 6(2):11-18.

International Research Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
Vol.6 (2),pp. 11-18, May 2021
ISSN 2488-9032
Available online at https://www.journalissues.org/IRJMBS/
https://doi.org/10.15739/irjmbs.21.003
copyright Author(s) retain the of this article. Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 International License.


Select Language »