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G Odoh
JN Uwakwe
JO Edah
JE Ojobi
EK Chuhwak

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G Odoh
JN Uwakwe
JO Edah
JE Ojobi
EK Chuhwak

International Research Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
Vol.4 (1),pp. 8-12, January 2019
ISSN 2488-9032
Available online at https://www.journalissues.org/IRJMBS/
DOI:https://doi.org/10.15739/irjmbs.19.002
Author(s) retain the copyright of this article. Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 International License.



Review

Pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome-The role of central obesity

*Odoh G1, Uwakwe JN1 , Edah JO1, Ojobi JE2 and Chuhwak EK1

1Department of Internal medicine, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos, Nigeria.
2Department of Internal Medicine, Federal Medical Center Markudi.

*Corresponding Author Email: gabrielodoh(at)gmail.com

Tel.:+2348034947611



date Received: November 23, 2018     date Accepted: January 23, 2019     date Published: January 28, 2019


 Abstract

The term Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) refers to the clustering of a number of cardiovascular risk factors: obesity (usually central), hypertension, dyslipidaemia, glucose intolerance, prothrombotic state and inflammation. MetS is a predictor of type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Jean Vague in the 1940s and early 1950s related the presence of male type (android form) of adiposity to the development of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases which are all important factors of the MetS. MetS is defined based on a variety of criteria, such as the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III), World Health Organization (WHO) and International Diabetes Federation (IDF) .Central obesity is an important component of MetS in these definitions. This is largely due to the key role played by the adipocyte in the development of the syndrome. The contents of this article were drawn from an extensive online search of literature covering the subject matter, and aims to review the pathophysiological role of central obesity in the development of the components of the metabolic syndrome.


Key words: Obesity, diabetes mellitus, cholesterol, cardiovascular risk


Odoh et al