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J Mufunda
Y Ndambakuwa
C Niang
D Munodawafa
A Kobie
M Gassama

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J Mufunda
Y Ndambakuwa
C Niang
D Munodawafa
A Kobie
M Gassama

International Research Journal of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences
Vol.1 (1),pp. 1-6, March 2016
ISSN 2488-9032
Available online at https://www.journalissues.org/IRJMBS/
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.15739/irjmbs.16.001
Article 16/ID/JMBR/ 06 pages
Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 International License.



Original Research Article

Health workers succumbed to the deadly Ebola disease during the early stages of the 2014 outbreak in Sierra Leone in spite of training, what are the lessons learned

Jacob Mufunda*1, Yustina Ndambakuwa2,Cheikh Niang3, Davison Munodawafa4, Aminata Kobie5, Mamodou Gassama6

1World Health Organization Country Office, Lusaka, Zambia
2Sydervlet Road, Canvey Island, England
3University Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar, Senegal
4World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa, Brazzaville
5World Health Organization Country Office, Freetown, Sierra Leone
6World Health Organization Country Office, Banjul, Gambia

*Corresponding Author Email: mufunda(at)yahoo.com



date Received: February 7, 2016     date Accepted: February 22, 2016     date Published: March 9, 2016


 Abstract

Frontline health workers in Sierra Leone received training on infection prevention and control (IPC) from experts on Ebola from Guinea and Liberia. Sierra Leone reported Ebola 2 months after Guinea.  Many nurses died despite IPC training. The purpose of the study was to answer four questions; why did many health workers succumb to Ebola and survivors ostracized by community? Was this a situation of perceived preparedness without being really effectively prepared? Why was implementation of preparedness not translated into health worker protection in early phases of the disease? Information was compiled from observation of practices associated to risk of Ebola infection and prevention as well as from focus group discussions.IPC capacity of health workers was weak with eleven nurses dying following unprotected contact with one infected nurse.  IPC should be provided to health workers including refreshing courses. Workers and families of deceased should receive food, financial, counselling and moral support. New messages portraying nurses as heroines risking their lives and sacrificing to save communities from Ebola should be disseminated in communities. At national level, incentives, and free health insurance cover should be provided.


Key words: Ebola, nurse training in infection prevention control, motivation, incentives, nurses dying from Ebola


Mufunda et al