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IC Mgbemena
CO Ezea
TE Ebe
UJ Udensi
AA Nwachukwu
DC Nzenwa
AL Nwannah

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IC Mgbemena
CO Ezea
TE Ebe
UJ Udensi
AA Nwachukwu
DC Nzenwa
AL Nwannah

Issues in Biological Sciences and Pharmaceutical Research
Vol.4(6),pp. 50-57, September 2016
ISSN 2350-1588
Article ID /16/BSPR025/08 pages
Available online at https://www.journalissues.org/IBSPR/
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.15739/ibspr.16.007
Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 International License.



Original Research Article

Asymptomatic malaria among students of Federal University of Technology, Owerri(FUTO), Imo State, Nigeria

Mgbemena, I.C⃰ 1; Ezea, C. O2; Ebe,T. E3; Udensi, U. J1; Nwachukwu, A. A1; Nzenwa, D. C.1; and Nwannah, A. L.4

1Department of Biotechnology, Federal University of Technology, P. M. B. 1526, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria.
2Department of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Technology, P. M. B. 1526, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria
3Department of Environmental Technology, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria
4Microbiology/Parasitology Department, Federal Medical Center, Owerri, Imo State, Nigeria.

*Corresponding Author Email: ifeyinwa.mgbemena(at)futo.edu.ng; drifeyinwac(at)gmail.com



date Received: July 7, 2016     date Accepted: August 29, 2016     date Published: September 5, 2016


 Abstract

The study aimed at determining the prevalence of asymptomatic malaria among students of Federal University of Technology Owerri, was carried out between July and September 2015. Blood samples of 160 students who lived both in school hostels and off campus residents were examined using Giemsa stained thick and thin films. A total of 40 students (25%) were infected with Plasmodium falciparium, with an overall asymptomatic case of 11.25%. Students of age 16-22 years had the highest prevalence of 28.28%, with an asymptomatic case of 46.43%, age group 23-29 years had a prevalence of 19.67%, with an asymptomatic case of 41.67%. It was observed that male students had the higher prevalence of 26.15%, with an asymptomatic case of 47.06%, while that of the females was 24.21%, with an asymptomatic case of 43.48%. On the relationship of malaria parasites and genotype, students with genotype ‘AA’ had an infection rate of 27.69%, with an asymptomatic case of 47.22% and students with genotype ‘AS’ had a prevalence of 13.33% with an asymptomatic case of 25%. The result shows that students with blood group O had highest prevalence of 60%, with an asymptomatic case of 61.1%. Blood group A has a prevalence of 27.5% with an asymptomatic case of 27.8%, and Blood group B has a prevalence of 12.5%, with an asymptomatic case of 11.1%, while blood group AB which was 5.62% of the study population had no case of prevalence. Asymptomatic malaria is prevalent in this community as reflected in this study; this could impact negatively on the health of the population. More efforts are needed to encourage public enlightenment on malaria diagnosis and treatment.


Key words: Parasitaaemia, prevalence, asymptomatic, malaria, students, plasmodium, anopheles


Mgbemena et al