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JA Idoko
T Iorlamen
AE Offordile

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JA Idoko
T Iorlamen
AE Offordile

International Journal of Agricultural Policy and Research
ISSN 2350-1561
6 (3), pp. 28-37, March 2018
Available online at https://www.journalissues.org/IJAPR/
DOI:https://doi.org/10.15739/IJAPR.18.004
Article 18/ID/JPR014/10/ pages
Author(s) retain the copyright of this article. Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 International License.



Original Research Article

Effect of intercropping some crop species with orange flesh sweet potato on the performance of orange flesh sweet potato varieties in Makurdi

1*Idoko, J.A, 1Iorlamen, T and 1Offordile, A.E.

Department of Crop Production, University of Agriculture, P.M.B.2373, Makurdi, Nigeria

*Corresponding Author E-mail: idokokole2010(at)yahoo.com

Tel.: +2347034920707



date Received: February 20, 2018     date Accepted: March 23, 2018     date Published: March 29, 2018


 Abstract

A field experiment was conducted during the growing of season of 2013/2014 and 2014/2015 at the Teaching and Research Farm of the Federal University of Agriculture, Makurdi, Benue State, located in the Southern Guinea Savanna of Nigeria. The objective of the experiment was to identify the effect of intercropping some crop species with orange fleshed sweet potato varieties and to know which crop will be most suitable under intercropping with the orange fleshed sweet potato varieties in Makurdi. The experiment was a 2×2 ×3 split-split plot laid out in randomized complete block design with three replications. The main plot treatments were two cropping systems [sole cropping (sweet potato, cassava, maize, soybean) and intercropping (sweet potato + cassava, sweet potato + maize and sweet potato + soybean)]. The sub plot treatments were made up of two sweet potato varieties (NARSP/05/022 and CIP 440 293). The sub-sub plot treatments comprised of three (3) crop species (cassava, maize and soybean). Each sub-sub plot consisted of 5 ridges spaced 1m apart and 3m long. Sole CIP gave higher vine length of sweet potato than sole NARSP while sole NARSP gave higher number of leaves, number of salable roots, and weight and fresh fodder weight of sweet potato than sole CIP. Intercropping with NARSP also gave higher number of leaves, number of salable roots, and weight and fresh fodder weight of sweet potato than intercropping with CIP. Sole cropping gave higher plant height and stem girth of cassava while intercropping gave higher root length and weight of salable roots of cassava. Intercropping cassava with CIP generally gave higher growth parameters of cassava while intercropping cassava with NARSP gave higher yield and yield parameters of cassava. Parameters evaluated for maize component showed that sole cropping gave higher number of rows/cob, number of kernels per row and grain yield than intercropping. Intercropping maize with CIP proved to be more productive than intercropping with NARSP. Higher growth and yield parameters of soybean were obtained under sole environments than intercropped. Intercropping with NARSP gave generally higher plant height of soybean while intercropping with CIP gave higher yield and yield parameters. Combinations with cassava gave higher values of LER and LEC than the other combinations. CR values of cassava were consistently higher than those of all intercrop combinations while sweet potato produced the lowest CR values.


Key words: Intercropping, sweet potato, maize, soybean, cassava


Idoko et al