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FM Barasa
W Christine
S Nathan
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JO Abwajo

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FM Barasa
W Christine
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SA George
VA Odini
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International Research Journal of Public and Environmental Health
Vol.2 (12),pp. 215-224,December 2015
ISSN 2360-8803
Available online at https://www.journalissues.org/IRJPEH/
DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.15739/irjpeh.041
Article 15/ID/JPRH091/ 10 pages
Author(s) agree that this article remain permanently open access under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 International License.



Original Research Article

State of sanitation and hygiene of public primary schools in Kakamega municipality, western Kenya

Faiza Mwatumu Barasa1*, Wanjala Christine4, Shaviya Nathan4, Barasa Mustafa4, Sowayi Alubokho George4, Vincent Aden Odini1, Johnston Wakhisi3 and Josphat Otwelo Abwajo2

1The Department of Epidemiology and Nutrition, Moi University Eldoret Town Campus, Eldoret.
2The Department of Environmental Health Moi University Eldoret Town Campus, Eldoret,
3The Department of Medical Biochemistry, Moi University Eldoret Town Campus, Eldoret.
4The Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences (MLS), Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology (MMUST), Kakamega, Kenya.

*Corresponding Author Email: mwafazz(at)yahoo.com
Tel.: +254728637125



date Received: October 14, 2015     date Accepted: November 14, 2015     date Published: December 7, 2015


 Abstract

This study assessed the state of sanitation and hygiene in public primary schools in Kakamega Municipality Division. All 25 public primary schools located in Kakamega Municipality Division participated. Descriptive cross-sectional study design was used. Stratified random sampling was used to select 400 pupils between class 4 and 7. Twenty five (25) teachers were purposively sampled. Study tools used were observational checklist and structured questionnaires. Data analysis was performed using SPSS version 21. Descriptive statistics including mean and cross tabulations were used. Pearson’s Chi-Square test was used to determine relationships between the variables. Approval by Institutional Research and Ethics Committee of  the Moi University and informed consent from all study participants was sought. The results indicated that the state of sanitary facilities in schools was poor, unmaintained and inadequate in almost 50% of schools. This demonstrated that investment in school infrastructure was not accorded due priority. Negative effects on pupil’s health were due to inaccessible safe drinking water and inadequate sanitary infrastructure despite pupils demonstrating acceptable levels of knowledge on personal hygiene and sanitation. As a result, pupils suffered from communicable diseases such as diarrhoea, flu and typhoid which could be prevented by improving sanitation in schools. The study concluded that physical infrastructure in schools within the study area were in a deplorable state and inadequate for the pupil population. Gaps were identified in school management of resources and enforcement of school health laws.


Key words: Sanitation, public health, personal hygiene, municipality


Barasa et al